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Events

Please find below a constantly updated list of informational events related to the North Caucasus and Chechnya for the current calendar year. Events from previous years are in a separate archive of events. Events organized by CAN, in cooperation with our partners, are identified as "A Chechnya Advocacy Network Event". Other events are organized by different institutions and advertised below as a service to interested audiences. We list events from all over the world as long as they are actually relevant to our target area; if you want to advertise an event here, please contact us at can@chechnyaadvocacy.org (we reserve the right to determine whether an event is relevant and appropriate). If you would like to receive emails about upcoming events, you may subscribe to our email service in the box on the right.


October 29, 2009:

PEN American Center, Human Rights Watch, the Committee to Protect Journalists, CUNYs School of Journalism, and WITNESS present:

Bearing Witness in Chechnya: The Legacy of Natalia Estemirova

Featuring Salman Rushdie, Michael Arena, Keith Gessen, Tanya Lokshina, Elena Milashina, Kati Marton, and Zarema Mukusheva

Proshansky Auditorium
CUNY Graduate School
365 Fifth Avenue, New York
7pm
Tickets are free. Seating is by general admission, on a first-come, first-served basis.

PEN American Center one of the worlds oldest literary and human rights organizations joins forces with the Human Rights Watch (HRW), the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), CUNYs School of Journalism, and WITNESS to pay tribute to Natalia Estemirova, the award-winning human rights activist and journalist murdered on July 15, 2009, while she was working on extremely sensitive cases of human rights abuses in Chechnya. The tribute -- a free public event -- will feature readings and conversations to honor the legacy of Estemirova, while calling attention to concerns of freedom of expression in the provinces of the North Caucasus and Russia. Participants will include Salman Rushdie (Best of Booker winning author, former PEN president), Michael Arena (former investigative reporter), Keith Gessen (co-editor-in-chief of n+1), Tanya Lokshina (Researcher at Human Rights Watch), Kati Marton (author, member of Human Rights Watch and CPJ boards), Elena Milashina (journalist for Novaya Gazeta), and Zarema Mukusheva (filmmaker, human rights activist for Memorial, Grozny, Chechnya).

Since 2000 Natalia Estemirova had been working for the highly respected Russian human rights organization Memorial in Grozny, Chechnya, where she documented the extrajudicial killings, abductions, rapes and other abuses perpetrated by various security forces since the second Chechen War (1999-2000). A special correspondent for Novaya Gazeta, she also served as a conduit to Chechnya for many western journalists. Despite the continued threats to her life, Estemirova continued to work with human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and by to record the plights of Chechnyans, she served as one of their voices to the world. She was the latest of several human rights campaigners of international renown (including journalist Anna Politkovskaya, human rights lawyer Stanislav Markelow and journalist Anastasia Baburova) to be gunned down in today's Russia.

About PEN American Center
Founded in 1922, PEN American Center is a fellowship of writers dedicated to defending freedom of expression and persecuted writers and journalists, advancing literature and literary translation, and fostering international literary exchange. It is the largest and most active of the 144 chapters in 101 countries that make up International PEN (founded in 1921). www.pen.org

About Human Rights Watch
Founded in 1978, Human Rights Watch is one of the worlds leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. For 30 years, Human Rights Watch has worked tenaciously to lay the legal and moral groundwork for deep-rooted change and has fought to bring greater justice and security to people around the world. www.hrw.org

About the Committee to Protect Journalists
Founded in 1981, the Committee to Protect Journalists is an independent, nonprofit organization founded in 1981. It promotes press freedom worldwide by defending the rights of journalists to report the news without fear of reprisal. www.cpj.org

About WITNESS
Founded in 1988, WITNESS uses video and online technologies to open the eyes of the world to human rights violations, empowering people to transform personal stories of abuse into powerful tools for justice, public engagement and policy change. WITNESS partners with human rights organizations to train and support them to use video as an integral tool within a campaign. www.witness.org

For press inquiries, please contact Isabelle Deconinck
Tel: 212-727-7662
Cell: 646-623-1709
isadeco@earthlink.net


October 07, 2009:

In Memory of Natasha Estemirova: A Panel Discussion
Columbia University
Garden Room, Faculty House
64 Morningside Drive (enter through SIPA or court next to Law School)
New York

12:00pm

Please join the Harriman Institute for a panel discussion in memory of Natasha Estemirova.

Participants:
Rachel Denber (Human Rights Watch),
Sarah Mendelson (Center for Strategic and International Studies),
Heidi Hoogerbeets (Center for Strategic and International Studies)

Moderator: Timothy Frye (Director, Harriman Institute).


July 9-20, 2009:

Renowned Chechen children's dance ensemble "Daimohk" touring UK

July 9-11:
Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod
Abbey Road, Llangollen LL20 8SW
Tickets and prices available through the festival website: http://www.llangollen2009.com/index.php/tickets
Tel: 01978 862016; fax: 01978 862002
Daimohk performing in the evening on July 11

July 13:
Michael Hall School Theatre
Tickets available from the office at Michael Hall School, Kidbrooke park, Forest Row, East Sussex , RH18 5JA
or The Seasons, Hartfield Road, Forest Row, East Sussex
Tickets £12 Adults, £7 for those 18 and under
or Tel: 01342 825 083
7:30pm

July 14:
Kings Langley Rudolf Steiner School
Langley Hill, Kings Langley, WD4 9JB
Tickets available now from the office at the Rudolf Steiner School
Tickets £10, £8 concession and £5 for children under 16
Tel: 01923 262505
www.rsskl.org or email info@rsskl.org
7:30pm

July 18 and 20:
Lilian Baylis Studio, Sadlers Wells
Rosebery Avenue, London EC1R 4TN, Angel Tube
Tickets available through the Booking Office: 0844 412 4300 (Mon-Sat 9am-8.30pm), Minicom (textphone): 020 7863 8015
July 18 tickets £14 / £10 concessions
July 20 fundraising night, tickets £30
7:15 pm

Peacebuilding UK is thrilled to be able to announce the venues and dates for this years Daimohk Tour in the UK. If you have not had the joy of seeing the Chechen Childrens Dance Ensemble before then please make an effort to come and see them - not only is the story and the spirit of these young dancers extraordinary, they really do shine in their own right as dancers worthy to take their place on the world stage. For more information on the group please see Peacebuilding UK's Daimohk page.

Daimohk is a 10-year old ensemble of currently 28 Chechen children aged 6-16, who perform amazingly energetic dances, including acrobatics and sword-throwing, as well as graceful formations and mesmerising instrumental numbers, to traditional music performed by six musicians. Watch a clip from a previous tour.

Chechens have survived two wars since the breakup of the Soviet Union. Many thousands of people have lived through terrible violence and chaos. Though the most recent war in the region is officially over, people are still recovering from this extended period of conflict.
Children were often turned into refugees and lived in tent camps or crowded accommodation, had their schooling stopped and lived in a state of constant uncertainty about what would happen to them and their parents.

For this reason, veteran Chechen folk dancer Ramzan Akhmadov set up Daimohk (which means 'ancestral land' in Chechen) in 1999, just before the most recent war began in Chechnya. He wanted to give a generation of children surrounded by violence a positive creative focus, and an outlet for emotional self-expression. Daimohk is completely non-political.

The children feel a great responsibility as cultural ambassadors for a war-torn region and their discipline and maturity is very striking. Rehearsals take place in a disused sports hall in Grozny though thanks to money raised on previous tours, a new dance hall has been started and is now nearly finished.

Daimohk regularly take part in high-profile dance competitions in Russia. Their participation in such events plays an important role in the vital reconciliation process between Chechens and Russians, whose relations have been severely damaged after many years of conflict.
The children of Daimohk show the human face of the Chechens, which helps to deconstruct the stereotype of Chechen fighters that remains in the minds of many Russians.

Ramzan Akhmadov, who has recently been made a deputy culture minister in Chechnya, will bring the ensemble to the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod in Wales, to two UK schools and to Sadlers Wells theatre in Islington.


February 19, 2009:

Image of War in Chechnya with Zarema Mukusheva

113 Barco Law Building
University of Pittsburgh
3900 Forbes Avenue
Oakland
6pm

Zarema Mukusheva, an H.J. Heinz Company Foundation fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, will deliver a lecture titled Image of War in Chechnya. Until taking up her fellowship, Zarema Mukusheva worked with the human rights organization "Memorial" in her native Chechnya as a human rights defender and film maker. She is a 2005 laureate of the Reebok Human Rights Award and received the Boundary-breaking Best Short Film Award at the 2008 Sydney Underground Film Festival for her documentary "Missing Lives". Zarema Mukusheva holds a degree in history from Chechen State University.

The event is part of the Global Issues Lecture Series at the University of Pittsburgh. For more information, contact Veronica Dristas at 412-624-2918 or dristas@pitt.edu.


January 12, 2009:

Holiday Concert held by the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations and the Russian Consulate in New York

Russian Consulate
9 East 91 Street
New York

6:30pm

The program includes classical music performances (Chopin, Schumann, Bartok, Rakhmaninoff etc.) by young musicians as well as Chechen folk dances performed by children from the Makhmud Esambaev Art School and has been arranged in cooperation with the Vladimir Spivakov International Charity Foundation.

To RSVP, please call the consulate at (212) 348 1717 or Ms. Tamara Lagutin at (805) 252 6845. (Attention: the consulate is closed for Russian national holidays until January 8.)


January 9, 2009:

Holiday Concert at the Embassy of the Russian Federation

With Participation of a Chechen children's dance group from the Makhmud Esambaev Art School

Embassy of the Russian Federation
3875 Tunlaw Rd., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20007
(entrance through the Tunlaw Rd. gates)

7pm

The Embassy of the Russian Federation in the United States of America cordially invites you to an exclusive performance by young Russian prodigies from Vladimir Spivakov International Charity Foundation and Makhmud Esambaev Art School on Friday, January 9, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at the Embassys Concert Hall. The program Children of the World against Terrorism includes classical music masterpieces, traditional and folk dances.

To secure your participation, please RSVP:
fax (202) 298-5751 or e-mail rusembconcert@gmail.com.
http://www.rccusa.org/


October 23, 2008:

Book Talk: Asne Seierstads The Angel of Grozny: Orphans of a Forgotten War

A Chechnya Advocacy Network/Harriman Institute Event

Room 1219
International Affairs Building
Columbia University
420 West 118th Street
New York
6:30pm

Norwegian journalist Asne Seierstad has reported on the conflict in Chechnya from its very beginning. She traveled in disguise and at great risk to herself to the region while working as a foreign correspondent in Moscow during the early days of the war in 1995. For The Angel of Grozny: Orphans of a Forgotten War (Basic Books 2008), Seierstad decided to return to Chechnya and spent two years living undercover there to try to understand what life was like under the startlingly brutal conditions in this beleaguered region, a society traumatized by constant violence and disorder. Seierstad focuses particular attention on the orphans and children who suffer from this forgotten war. From 1994 to the present, twenty-five thousand children in Chechnya have lost one or both parents.

These orphans of Chechnya have grown up surrounded by war and accustomed to violence. Some are homeless. Some have already become young criminals. Some may grow up to join the resistance and contribute to the violence that continues to grip their society. The Angel of the title is a Chechen woman who started taking in homeless and abandoned children to create a makeshift orphanage. Seierstad asks the most vital question: What will happen when these children try to shape the future of Chechnya? It is the first book that takes a close, inside look at Chechen society after the wars. The book documents a society that is shattered, ailing and scared. Unlike most books on Chechnya, the author, who spent a lot of time in Chechnya undercover as a Chechen woman, extensively covers the lives of Chechen women. The Angel of Grozny also features some of the most perceptive and revealing coverage of the new regime of Ramzan Kadyrov.

In The Angel of Grozny, Seierstad has written both a valuable personal account and an informative history. She lived amid the violence, and even came under fire herself. But she also interviewed and had first-hand encounters, with both the children of Chechnya and the decision-makers in Grozny, the capital city. This combination has produced a powerful and important example of literary reporting at its best. Read recent reviews by the International Herald Tribune and the Christian Science Monitor.

Asne Seierstad is an award-winning journalist who has reported from such war-torn regions as Chechnya, China, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. She is the author of A Hundred and One Days as well as The Bookseller of Kabul, an international bestseller that has been translated into 38 languages.


October 21, 2008:

Launch Party for I live here, by Mia Kirshner, J.B. MacKinnon, Paul Shoebridge & Michael Simons

Idlewild Books
12 W.19th St. (near 5th Ave.)
New York, NY 10011
7pm

RSVP to events@idlewildbooks.com

Sonny Mehta and Idlewild Books invite you to celebrate the launch of I live here, an intimate journey to humanitarian crises in four corners of the world: war in Chechnya, ethnic cleansing in Burma, economic dislocation in Mexico, and AIDS in Malawi. This unique book is a visually stunning narrative told through journals, stories, images, and graphic novellas in which the lives of refugees and displaced people become at once personal and global. The voices featured are those of displaced women and children, in their own words or in stories told in text and images by noted writers and artists.

Canadian actress Mia Kirshner's journals guide us through a unique paper documentary brought vividly to life in collaboration with J.B. MacKinnon, Paul Shoebridge, and Michael Simons, with featured works by Joe Sacco, Ann-Marie MacDonald, Phoebe Gloeckner, Chris Abani, Karen Connelly, Kamel Khelif, and many others.

From the book's Journeys - Ingushetia:
The border of the Russian republic of Ingushetia is not even fifty miles from Grozny, the capital city of Chechnya. Today, some 15,000 Chechen refugees live in Ingushetia. Mia Kirshner and Joe Sacco traveled here together, returning with first-person accounts, video, photographs, and other materials gathered in Nazran and Moscow. The chapter includes journals by Mia Kirshner, the story of a young refugee as told by J.B. MacKinnon, the story of a young piano virtuoso as told by Ann-Marie Macdonald, and a graphic novella of Chechen refugees by Joe Sacco.

Reception sponsored by Moet.


June 13, 2008:

Conference: Islam in the post-Soviet Caucasus - Legal, Social and Political Aspects

Centre of Contemporary Central Asia and the Caucasus, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cccac/)

B102, Brunei Gallery
SOAS
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London
9am- 6pm

A one-day conference about (mostly) contemporary developments concerning the role of Islam in politics, society, culture and armed conflict across the Russian North Caucasus, with local, Russian and international experts presenting field and archive-based research.

Speakers/Chairs:
Anna Zelkina (SOAS, Centre for Contemporary Central Asia and the Caucasus)
Domitilla Sagramoso (Kings College, London University)
Moshe Gammer (Professor, Department of the Middle East History, Tel-Aviv University)
Aude Merlin (Universite Libre de Bruxelles)
Ahmet Yarlykapov (Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow)
Naima Neflyasheva (Caucasian Studies Centre, Institute of African Studies, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow)
Michail Roschin (Institute for Oriental Studies, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow)
Amir Navruzov (Institute of History Archeology and Ethnography, Russian Academy of Science, Daghestan)
Shamil Shikhaliev (Department of Oriental Manuscripts, Institute of History, Archeology and Ethnography, Russian Academy of Science, Mahachkala)
Vladimir Bobrovnikov (Institute of Oriental Studies, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow)
Sylvia Serrano (Centre dEtudes du Monde Russe et Sovietique - EHESS/CNRS, Paris)
Musa Basnoukaev (Department of Economics, The Chechen State University, Groznyi)
Galina Khizrieva (Russian Institute of Cultural Studies, Moscow)
Ahmet Sultygov (PhD Candidate, Russian Institute of Cultural Studies, Moscow)

Download a detailed schedule, including titles of presentations, here. To register, please email Anna Zelkina.


May 13, 2008:

Between war and peace, tradition and modernity: women in Chechnya and their role in rebuilding, development and social change
A presentation by Gistam Sakaeva

Islamic Cultural Center of Northern California (ICCNC)
1433 Madison Street
Oakland
7 pm

Gistam Sakaeva is a board member and project officer of the Chechnya-based women's organization Doveriye. Under her leadership, Doveriye has been running bold and far-reaching programs for women in Chechnya, in areas like income-generation, psychological help for
victims of rape during war and campaigns against gender-based violence. Ms. Sakaeva is a consummate expert on gender issues in Chechnya and an outspoken leader for change. Her work has been recognized by the International Rescue Committee's Women's Commission,
which has chosen Gistam as a winner of its 2008 Voices of Courage Award. Before working with Doveriye, Ms. Sakaeva had a decade-long career with international humanitarian aid organizations like Care, Doctors Without Borders and Handicap international in the North
Caucasus. In 2007, she spent a two-month fellowship at the International Center for Tolerance Education in New York, during which time she studied disability and women's programs in the US. She returned to New York in March 2008 to attend the annual session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women as an NGO delegate, the first ever from Chechnya. During both visits she gave presentations about her work at universities across the US, including Cornell University, Columbia University and the University of California at Berkeley. She holds a degree in English language and literature from Chechen State University. Ms. Sakaeva is currently visiting the US to receive the 2008 Voices of Courage Award

The event is open to the public and sponsored by the Chechnya Advocacy Network, American Friends Service Committee, ICCNC and Interfaith Women for Peace.


May 5, 2008:

The Russia Project and the International Womens Program cordially invite you to a discussion on

Womens Rights and Social Change in Chechnya

With guest speaker Gistam Sakaeva (Doveriye - Reliance) and an introduction by Rachel Denber (Human Rights Watch)

Open Society Institute
400 W. 59th Street (between 9th & 10th Avenues)
New York, New York
3rd Floor
2pm 3pm

Gistam Sakaeva is a board member and project officer of the Chechnya-based womens organization Reliance. Under her leadership, Reliance has been running bold and far-reaching programs for women in Chechnya, in areas like income-generation, psychological help for victims of rape during war and campaigns against gender-based violence. Her work has been recognized by the International Rescue Committees Womens Commission, which selected Sakaeva to receive its 2008 Voices of Courage Award. Before working with Reliance, Sakaeva had a decade-long career with international humanitarian aid organizations in the North Caucasus including Care, Doctors Without Borders and Handicap International.

Rachel Denber is Deputy Director of the Europe and Central Asia Division at Human Rights Watch. Prior to her current post, Denber was the head of Human Rights Watch's Moscow office from 19921997. She has written about and traveled widely throughout Russia, the southern Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Baltic states.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Please send your RSVP to events@sorosny.org with the event title in the subject line, and include your full name and affiliation.

Note: seating may be limited.


April 23, 2006:

Berkat and Marsho Happiness and Freedom

A documentary about the formative years and experiences of Chechen children growing up in refugee camps and post-war Chechnya, followed by a discussion with Jana Hradilkova, co-founder and program director of the Czech civic association Berkat working with the Chechen children.

A Chechnya Advocacy Network/Harriman Institute Event

Room 1219
International Affairs Building
Columbia University
420 West 118th Street
New York
12pm

About Marsho and Berkat (David Ealek / Czech Republic / 2007 / 52 min)
The children's dance group Marsho came into being in the Sputnik refugee camp on the Chechen-Ingush border. Over 9,000 Chechen refugees have been living here for more than five years. Following the massacre of civilians in Chechnya, an organisation called Berkat was set up in the Czech Republic with the aim of helping victims, in particular women. In 2003 Berkat set up a tour by the Marsho childrens dance group in the Czech Republic. The aim was both to allow the children to experience something other than the horrors of war, and to draw the attention of Czechs to the desperate situation in a country with a media blackout. In 2006 Berkat decided to invite the children again. In the meantime the Sputnik camp had been broken up and the children had been scattered around Chechnya. Many things had changed in their lives. They themselves had also changed and their reception in the Czech Republic was different too. They were no longer pitiful war children grateful for cuddly toys. Suddenly they had become demanding young people with an uncertain future seen by some as young terrorists.

Berkat has worked with Marsho since 2001. The film was produced from footage shot over three years and includes an introduction to the conflict in Chechnya. It screened at the Czech film festival One World, where it was voted an audience favorite. In addition to interviews with journalist and Berkat founder Petra Prochazkova and Berkat program director Jana Hradilkova, there are interviews with young Chechens with whom Berkat has been working since they were children. The film is fundamentally about the importance of building lasting relationships between an isolated Chechnya and the open societies of the outside world.


April 17, 2008:

A documentary about the formative years and experiences of Chechen children growing up in refugee camps and post-war Chechnya, followed by a discussion with Jana Hradilkova, co-founder and program director of the Czech civic association Berkat working with the Chechen children.

An American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus (ACPC) at Freedom House event

Goethe Institute
812 Seventh Street, NW
Washington, DC
6-8 pm

About Marsho and Berkat (David Ealek / Czech Republic / 2007 / 52 min)
The children's dance group Marsho came into being in the Sputnik refugee camp on the Chechen-Ingush border. Over 9,000 Chechen refugees have been living here for more than five years. Following the massacre of civilians in Chechnya, an organisation called Berkat was set up in the Czech Republic with the aim of helping victims, in particular women. In 2003 Berkat set up a tour by the Marsho childrens dance group in the Czech Republic. The aim was both to allow the children to experience something other than the horrors of war, and to draw the attention of Czechs to the desperate situation in a country with a media blackout. In 2006 Berkat decided to invite the children again. In the meantime the Sputnik camp had been broken up and the children had been scattered around Chechnya. Many things had changed in their lives. They themselves had also changed and their reception in the Czech Republic was different too. They were no longer pitiful war children grateful for cuddly toys. Suddenly they had become demanding young people with an uncertain future seen by some as young terrorists.

Berkat has worked with Marsho since 2001. The film was produced from footage shot over three years and includes an introduction to the conflict in Chechnya. It screened at the Czech film festival One World, where it was voted an audience favorite. In addition to interviews with journalist and Berkat founder Petra Prochazkova and Berkat program director Jana Hradilkova, there are interviews with young Chechens with whom Berkat has been working since they were children. The film is fundamentally about the importance of building lasting relationships between an isolated Chechnya and the open societies of the outside world.

Please send your RSVPs to intern-acpc@freedomhouse.org.


April 8, 2008:

Russia and the Circassians: An Internal Problem or an International Matter?

Carr Center for Human Rights Policy/ Harvard University
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies/ Harvard University
Jamestown Foundation
Circassian Cultural Institute

John F. Kennedy School of Government
Harvard University
79 JFK St., Taubman building, Nye A,
Cambridge, MA 02138

Full-day seminar on the history and contemporary politics of the Circassian ethnic group in Russia and the diaspora, with experts from Russia, the US, Canada, Europe and Turkey. Details can be downloaded here.


April 7-11, 2008:

Europes Darkest Corner: Photographs from Chechnya 1994-2007
Photo exhibition and conference

Co-sponsored by ECRE, FIDH, Pax Christi Flanders, Human Rights Watch, Norwegian Refugee Council, Etudes Sans Frontieres, IDMC, EPP-ED and MEPs Bart Staes, Helene Flautre and Patrick Gaubert

Photographs by Heidi Bradner - Thomas Dworzak - Mikhail Galustov- Stanley Greene - James Hill - Musa Sadulayev

Reception:
ASP, Rez de Chaussee
Couloir, European Parliament

April 7, 2008, 18:45pm

The photo exhibition will be on view from 7 to 11 April 2008 in the same location.

This reception will be followed the next day by a conference on:
Where is Chechnya heading and what role can the EU play?

Eastman 300
Rue Belliard 135
1047 Brussels
April 8, 2008
9.30-12.00


9h30: Welcome - Bart Staes (MEP, Greens)

9h45: Introduction: Overview of positions of the European Parliament on
Chechnya - Helene Flautre (MEP, Greens, chairwoman of the sub-Committee on Human Rights)

10h00: Current human rights situation in Chechnya and North Caucasus
Natalya Estemirova (Memorial)

10h30: Racial discrimination against Chechens in Russia
Svetlana Gannushkina (Civic Assistance Committee)

11h00: Break

11h10: Screening of Human Rights Watch Film on European Court of Human Rights

11h20: Fight against impunity: implementing ECHR rulings
Tanya Lokshina (Human Rights Watch) and Arbi Chitayev, Chechen ECHR applicant

11h50: Conclusions


March 11, 2008:

Between war and peace, tradition and modernity: women in Chechnya and their role in rebuilding, development and social change
A presentation by Gistam Sakaeva

A Chechnya Advocacy Network/Harriman Institute Event

Room 1219
International Affairs Building
Columbia University
420 West 118th Street
New York
4:15pm

Gistam Sakaeva is a board member and project officer of the Chechnya-based womens organization Doveriye. Under her leadership, Doveriye has been running bold and far-reaching programs for women in Chechnya, in areas like income-generation, psychological help for victims of rape during war and campaigns against gender-based violence. Ms. Sakaeva is a consummate expert on gender issues in Chechnya and an outspoken leader for change. Her work has been recognized by the International Rescue Committees Womens Commission, which has chosen Gistam as a winner of its 2008 Voices of Courage Award. Before working with Doveriye, Ms. Sakaeva had a decade-long career with international humanitarian aid organizations like Care, Doctors Without Borders and Handicap international in the North Caucasus. She holds a degree in English language and literature from Chechen State University. Ms. Sakaeva is visiting New York to attend the 2008 session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women as an NGO delegate.

The event is open to the public.


February 28, 2008:

Columbia University's Russian International Association presents: "Twelve", a new film by Nikita Mikhalkov

Roone Arledge Theatre, Lerner Hall
Columbia University
New York
7pm

"Twelve" is the most recent film by acclaimed Russian director Nikita Mikhalkov. It had its international premiere at the 2007 Venice Film Festival and is nominated for the 2008 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

The film's plot follows that of Hollywood classic "Twelve Angry Men", in which one juror sets out to convince the jury of the defendant's innocence. Set in contemporary Russia, "Twelve" makes the defendant an ethnic Chechen boy, who stands accused of murdering his stepfather, a Russian military officer. The film deals with the sensitive subjects of prejudice and corruption.

Russian language only. The film's trailer can be watched at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBq_Y0kgkMY.

IMPORTANT: If you are not a current Columbia University student or other affiliate, please RSVP to russiancolumbia@gmail.com by February 26, in order to be granted access to Lerner Hall.


Events Archive

Look up events organized by CAN or others since mid-2004 here:
Events in 2007
Events in 2006
Events in 2005
Events in 2004

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The Chechnya Advocacy Network was formed out of deep concern about the situation in Chechnya and the surrounding areas and the challenges faced by Chechen refugees elsewhere. We strive to raise awareness of the situation in the region, particularly its human dimension, advocate for a strong international response to humanitarian and rebuilding challenges and work to empower local people to improve their communities. We do not endorse any specific political outcomes. Instead, our goal is to help the residents of the North Caucasus region build a peaceful and happy future. We welcome everyone who shares these goals with us.

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